Resources

Berlin Architecture Resource

There is so much to learn about the Modern Architecture of Berlin,

our featured books…

     

Dutch Embassy In Berlin By Oma/Rem Koolhaas  by Rem Koolhaas, 2004

Sketches, drawings and models illustrate the design’s points of departure, and Koolhaas himself expounds upon the project’s context.  Everything you need to know and more about this fantastic example of modern architecture.

BUILDING BERLIN Vol 1.: The Latest Architecture in and out of the Capital by Chamber of Architects Berlin (ed.), 2012

The overview of more than 70 contemporary projects in and from Berlin is augmented by architecture essays by renowned authors and interviews.

there’s more


        

Modern Architecture in Berlin by Rolf Rave, 2009

With texts and images, the book presents 466 architectural works built from 1907 to the present day. The author’s choices support the greater intention to present what can now be deemed contemporary, typical, and exemplary about every period of Berlin’s diverse, irregular, and amazingly rich architectural history.

Berlin – The Architecture Guide: Updated (Architecture Guides) by Braun Publishing, 2012

This architectural guide provides expert guides to the capital city and largest metropolis in Germany.


Daniel Libeskind: Jewish Museum Berlin: Museum Building Guides by Daniel Libeskind, 2011

For Libeskind, a Polish Jew raised not far from Berlin who lost many relatives in the Holocaust, this extraordinary building was an intensely personal undertaking.


Holocaust Memorial Berlin: Eisenman Architects by Hanno Rauterberg, 2005

The enormity and scale of the horror of the Holocaust is such that any attempt to represent it by traditional means is inevitably inadequate . . . Our memorial attempts to present a new idea of memory as distinct from nostalgia . . . We can only know the past today through a manifestation in the present. Peter Eisenman

A Guide to Modern Architecture

The Intention of Architectural Photography

Architectural Photography can serve several objectives, knowing what your objective is will produce a collection of photos that will be useful for you in the future and will help direct your photographic decisions while on site.

Postcard photography: Visiting Modern Architecture

Many buildings have a particular view-point which is easily recognizable and widely documented.  This type of photography typically aims at getting a snap shot of the building from its most recognizable vantage point.  These photos do not require a lot of creativity but rather serve as a kind of proof that you visited the building.  Often people stand in front of the structure as further evidence of their presence.  These are fun and can be used in your slide shows or on social media platforms to show friends and family you were there.

 Visiting Ronchamp – there i am standing in front of the most notable angle of the building

Documentary Architectural Photography:

This is a method of photography where the photos sever to document the architecture in the most truthful means possible.  This type of photography would not implement any personal artistic expression but rather try to utilize as much technical skills to replicate the building’s specific design qualities.

Fred and Ginger by Frank Gehry, this photo represents what the building looks like in its context without any artistic interpretation.

Detail Photography:

This is an important type of photography for those who are very interested in the tectonics of architecture.  These photos focus on how materials come together and on the minute details that represent the whole building.  Mies said “God is in the Detail” these photos embody that principle.  I value these photos the most because they are very difficult to find and are not publically documented often.  They are typically more useful for architects or others in the industry for detailing ideas and should be catalogued well (for tips on cataloguing photos).

I really liked how this handrail felt – so I took a photo for my records

Collection Photography:

Some people enjoy collecting images of a particular architectural element from many different buildings sometimes from all over the world and compiling them into a collection.  Similar to a stamp collection, the architectural element is taken out of its context for review and comparison.  These collections are very always very interesting because they are so focused and by this repetitive comparison you can really begin to distinguish the minute differences in the architectural comparison.  I recommend trying this sometime.

In Peru I was fascinated with the different construction methods of the stone walls, here are a couple from my series. 

Journalistic photography:

This type of photography tells a story about the building.  It requires more attention to the architectural function and often the interaction of people in the space.  Journalistic architectural photography can humanize a building or do the opposite but it will require the photographer to be very conscious of how they want the photo will be interpreted.

As i walked under the building canopy and looked up the ‘skirt of Ginger’.  This photo represents that moment where the building transformed from playful to knotty. 

Artistic Architectural Photography:

Your artistic expression in architectural photography can be the most fun for those who enjoy photography professionally or as a hobby.  The architecture is the subject matter but the photo is really an expression of the photographer and not the architect (unlike the documentary style).  There are endless ways to be artistic with architectural photography however your interpretation of the architecture is the real purpose and at the forefront of the photograph.

This photo of Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre, Osoyoos, crops out much of the building and focuses on what i thought to be the most beautiful elements of the building: the slight curved wall composed colorfully stripping rammed earth and the long horizontal window. 
Next time you are photographing architecture think about the photos purpose….

Visit architectureGROUPIE.com a Modern and Contemporary Architecture Travel Guide

Chicago Architecture Resources

There is much to learn about the modern architecture in Chicago,  for those who want to learn more…

Here are a few books to help you further appreciate Chicago’s modern architecture:

The Modern Wing: Renzo Piano and The Art Institute of Chicago

by James Cuno, Mr. Paul Goldberger, Joseph Rosa, Judith Turner 2009

The museum’s director, James Cuno, discusses the history of the commission, and Paul Goldberger writes on how this building fits into the larger context of Piano’s work—especially his many museum designs—as well as considers its positioning in a city celebrated for its architecture. Judith Turner provides exquisite architectural photographs, showing many nuanced details and views of the structure, while Joseph Rosa comments on her images and how they convey the beauty and sophistication of the building. Photographs by New York-based architectural photographer Paul Warchol complete the book.  Renzo Piano’s largest museum to date.

Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark (Historical Studies of Urban America)

by Timothy Gilfoyle 2006

Gilfoyle studied the history of downtown; spent years with the planners, artists, and public officials behind Millennium Park; documented it at every stage of its construction; and traced the skeins of financing through municipal government, global corporations, private foundations, and wealthy civic leaders. The result is a thoroughly readable and lavishly illustrated testament to the park, the city, and all those attempting to think and act on a monumental scale.

Chicago Architecture and Design

By Jay Pridmore, George A. Larson, Hedrich Blessing (Photographer) 2005

Looking at famous structures from the inside out, the book has won praise for its emphasis on the graceful interiors of Chicago’s finest buildings. The vivid text discusses the life and work of such towering figures as Daniel Burnham, Louis H. Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Mies van der Rohe, as well as that of the many lesser-known builders who have contributed to Chicago’s reputation as “an architect’s city.”

Bertrand Goldberg: Architecture of Invention (Art Institute of Chicago)

By Zoe Ryan, Alison Fisher, Elizabeth Smith, Sarah Whiting  2011

Bertrand Goldberg was a visionary Chicago architect whose designs for housing, urban planning, and industrial design made a distinctive mark in the modern era. In 1959, he conceived the plan for  the sixty-story Marina City residential towers, in the heart of downtown Chicago. He created a number of hospitals that offered a new paradigm for how patients and staff interacted within the space. Goldberg’s progressive designs also extended to schools, prefabricated structures, and furniture.

Chicago Makes Modern: How Creative Minds Changed Society

By Mary Jane Jacob 2012

Chicago is a city dedicated to the modern—from the skyscrapers that punctuate its skyline to the spirited style that inflects many of its dwellings and institutions, from the New Bauhaus to Hull-House. Despite this, the city has long been overlooked as a locus for modernism in the arts, its rich tradition of architecture, design, and education disregarded. Still the modern in Chicago continues to thrive, as new generations of artists incorporate its legacy into fresh visions for the future. Chicago Makes Modern boldly remaps twentieth-century modernism from our new-century perspective.

also see TIPS FOR VISITING CHICAGO MODERN ARCHITECTURE

A Guide to Modern Architecture

Toronto Architecture Resources

There are many resources on Toronto Architecture,

for those who want to learn more…

Here are a few books that will help you while admiring Toronto’s modern architecture:

Toronto Architecture
 
Bold Visions: The Architecture of the Royal Ontario Museum
 
  Toronto architecture
    Concrete Toronto: A Guide to Concrete Architecture from the Fifties to the Seventies
 
  Toronto Architecture
Frank Gehry in Toronto: Transforming the Art Gallery of Ontario
 Toronto Architecture
  Design City Toronto (Interior Angles)

Toronto guide bookToronto Architecture Guide Book

Awesome websites to follow that feature cool Toronto Architecture and more:

Modern Toronto:  http://www.modto.com/

Spacing Toronto:http://spacingtoronto.ca/

A Guide to Modern Architecture