Architecture Books

A few ways architecture can come to you.

There are many reasons why traveling to visit architecture in distant cities can be difficult, the cost of travel has gone up significantly, it is hard to get time off work, you have obligations, you just don’t like to travel or you can’t afford it.  In my case I recently had a baby thus realizing this is going to change how I travel and how much I travel as much as I didn’t want to believe it before.  So I have been thinking about all the ways I can still get my architecture fix without travel and possibly without even leaving my house.  Here are my suggestions:

Books

 

I love books, let me clarify, I love big coffee table books.  There are thousands of beautiful modern architecture books available with amazing photos and lots of information about architecture and their architects.  Many books are compilation of architecture projects, Phaidon Press always creates awesome modern architecture books.  My favorite recent book is The Phaidon Atlas of 21st Century World Architecture which features more than 1000 of the finest architecture completed since the year 2000 from around the world.  And now that I think about it you don’t need to leave your house for books anymore either.

Click here for some more book suggestions.

 

 

Magazines

For those who like to stay in the know regarding new architectural projects, awards, news, and events magazines are just the thing. They are also idea for flipping through while having your morning coffee, they are easy to digest, portable and not precious objects so they can be recycled when you are done.  You can also subscribe to magazines so you don’t even need to think about it.  Here are some good ones.

           

Digital Books and Magazines

Although there is nothing like a tangible book I am very fond of all things digital.  If you have a Kobo, Kindle, or tablet you can purchase digital architecture books or magazines so if you are the type that doesn’t like a lot of stuff or don’t have a lot of space this is perfect.  Plus you can order them anytime of day and get it instantly.

Architecture Documentaries

I always say that because architecture is three dimensional it should be viewed in person to understand the true space and to grasp the real nature of the architecture HOWEVER the next best thing is film.  There are some outstanding Documentaries about architecture where you can learn about a series of projects by one architect or learn a ton about one building.  Click here for a link to a bunch of architecture documentaries worth getting.

               

Lectures

Check out your local architecture college / university they often run architectural lecture series through the school year bringing in some really fascinating architects to speak about their work.  I have seen Elizabeth Diller, Tadao Ando, Craig Dykers from Snohetta, Kazuyo Sejima from SANNA,and so forth.  Listening to the architect speak of the challenges, the inspiration and reasoning is priceless and I have found very inspiring.  Other places to learn about lectures or events is in magazines, also check you local architecture associations website there is usually a list of events.

Youtube

Youtube is not new but I feel like I have only recently realized its true value when it comes to architecture.   There are countless interviews with architects and short documentaries about buildings on youtube, they vary in length and context but they are similar to lectures in that you can get the real scoop on process and design, challenges and my favourite is seeing how different the office environments are.  I have a few blog posts that have several youtube links, see below, or you can just search youtube for whatever or whomever you are interested in.

Learn more about Bjarke Ingels (B.I.G)

Interviews with Zaha Hadid

Websites

There are lots of great architecture websites.  I list a bunch in this blog post:

 12 awesome ARCHITECTURE websites

 

These are a few ways to have architecture come to you.

Advertisements

Architectural Photographers that will leave you speechless

Hisao Suzuki Photography

Sometimes the architecture is the star of the photograph  other-times the architecture is the subject and the photograph is the showstopper.  Noteworthy  architectural photographers,  Ezra Stoller, Iwan Baan,  Lucien HervéJulius Shulman, Erieta Attali, and Hisao Suzuki capture architecture that will leave you speechless by the sheer fact that they are amazing photographers.  Architectural photography on occasion is so powerful in their representation their images will forever represent the building’s the photograph.

Architectural photography is an art which two-dimensionally represents the essence of the three-dimensional built form and the architect’s idea and vision.  We can aspire to their work and look at their talent not just as a mastery of technique but also a unique and insightful way they see space, light and lines.  Their photos and career inspire my architectural photography i hope you take a moment to notice the talent of this small collection of images which represent architecture in a magical way.

Ezra Stoller Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Ezra Stoller was born in Chicago, 1915, but grew up in New York.  When he was a student he photographed buildings, models and sculpture. In 1942 he was drafted to work as a photographer for the Army Signal Corps Photo Center. Stoller had a long architectural photography career, working closely with Eero Saarinen, Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Meier, Paul Rudolph, Marcel Breuer, I.M. Pei, Gordon Bunshaft and Mies van der Rohe.

Many modern buildings are known by the iconic images Stoller created due to his talent at visualizing the formal and spatial aspirations of modernist architecture. In 1960 Ezra Stoller was awarded a medal for his photography, the first time the American Institute of Architects awarded a medal for architectural photography.

Ezra Stoller’s photographs are published in countless books and magazines:

Ezra Stoller received an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Pratt Institute in 1998 and died in 2004 in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

http://www.esto.com/ezrastoller.aspx

Iwan Baan Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Iwan Baan was born in 1975 and raised outside of Amsterdam, he studied at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague and worked in New York and Europe in publishing and documentary photography.

In 2005 he proposed that he document a project by OMA to Rem Koolhaas. The documentation of the construction and completion of OMA’s China Central Television (CCTV) building and National Olympic Stadium by Herzog & de Meuron’s in Beijing led to his career in architectural photography.   Since he has photographed work by Frank Gehry, SANAA, Morphosis, Steven Holl, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Toyo Ito and Zaha Hadid.

His work is characterized by the portrayal of people in the architecture, the context, society and environment around architecture.

Books featuring Iwan Baan’s photography:

http://www.iwan.com/iwan_index.php

Lucien Hervé Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Lucien Hervé was born in László Elkán, Hungry, and died in Paris at the age of 26.  Known primarily for his architectural photography of Le Corbusier.

“Lucien Hervé is one of the rare photographers to combine a humanist outlook with an architect’s eye. His characteristic style of cropped frames, plunging or oblique views, and pared-down compositions tending toward abstraction distinguish his work from that of his contemporaries.”

Books on Lucien Hervé:

http://www.lucienherve.com/

Julius Shulman Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Julius Shulman (1910 – 2009) was an American architectural photographer known for his photographs of the California modern architecture movement such as the iconic shots of the Case Study House #22, Frank Lloyd Wright’s or Pierre Koenig’s remarkable structures, have been published countless times.

“The clarity of his work demanded that architectural photography had to be considered as an independent art form. Each Shulman image unites perception and understanding for the buildings and their place in the landscape. The precise compositions reveal not just the architectural ideas behind a building’s surface, but also the visions and hopes of an entire age. A sense of humanity is always present in his work, even when the human figure is absent from the actual photographs.”

Many of the buildings photographed by Shulman have since been demolished or re-purposed, lending to the popularity of his images.  His vast library of images currently reside at the Getty Center in Los Angeles.

Books on Julius Shulman:

http://www.juliusshulmanfilm.com/shulman-photographs/

Erieta Attali Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Erieta Attali was born in Tel Aviv in 1966 and studied Photography at Goldsmith’s College, University of London.
Her talents are proven by her awards including Fulbright Artist Award in Architectural Photography, the Japan Foundation Artist Fellowship,  and the Graham Foundation Grant, Chicago.

Attali’s career as an architectural photographer began by working internationally, being published in various books of architecture and periodicals and being exhibited in major museums and institutions.  From 1992 to 2002 she worked in the field of Archaeological Photography.  From 2003 she has been an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Architectural Photography at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University, New York.

Work of Erieta Attali:

http://www.erietaattali.com/

Hisao Suzuki Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Hisao Suzuki was born in 1957 in Yamagata, Japan. He studied at the Tokyo College of Photography and moved to Barcelona in 1982 to observe the work of Anotnio Gaudi, where he still resides, becoming immersed in contemporary architecture.

Suzuki is currently the principal photographer for the architectural journal El Croquis.

“A photographer may take one of two stances: either demonstrate a work within its reality and its environment, or demonstrate the image of the work that the photographer himself has created. In Suzuki’s case the former is true, for his work is a true testimony and documentation of reality.”

http://www.nuaa.es/eng/hisao.html

VISIT archGROUPIE.com to find modern and contemporary architecture

Architect Sketches

architects sketch

“God created paper so that architecture could be drawn on it”

Alvar Alto

We are forever fascinated by the Architect’s doodle and how those scribbles on a napkin transform into architecture.

The architect’s sketch is often described as an intuitive force which emerges as a way of communicating their vision to the client.  These scribbles on the page hold so much insight into how that architect thinks and conveys their ideas to the world.  Sometimes ithey are so abstracted from a built form we understand that only when it is complete all the ideas held within the sketch are completely understood.

Many sketches hang in museums and are viewed as pieces of art but where only created as tools for the architect to express their ideas. Over the course of their career architects create thousands of sketches to convey every detail of the building, they say a picture is worth a thousand words but a sketch is worth far more than that.

I am spellbound by these sketches, check the arch GROUPIE Flickr account for a small sample of some of our favourite architect’s sketches.

The Sketch Plan Build: World Class Architects Show How It’s Done by Alejandro Bahamon, Wendy Griswold is a great way to see how architect’s sketches come to life with sketches set beside the built space – fantastic and enlightening.

Architect’s Drawings  by Kendra Smith contains a large collection of sketches, each containing a summary of the building, the sketch style and media, the architect’s thinking and intentions.

Dinner for Architects: A Collection of Napkin Sketches is a great coffee table book with less indepth analysis but a great collection nonethless.

Architects’ Sketchbooks will insprie anone to pick up a pencil and start sketching, another great book those who enjoy looking at these drawings.

Architect's Sketches

Architects sketchArchitects' Sketchbooks

Zaha Hadid’s sketches come to life in her book Zaha Hadid -Sketches -by Zellweger

Another great resource for architectural sketches: Architecture Sketch Blog

Pass this along

Learn more about Bjarke Ingels (B.I.G)

Bjarke Ingels

Bjarke Ingels was born in 1974 and founded B.I.G. (Bjarke Ingels Group) based in both Copenhagen and New York they are well known for innovative and nontraditional design ideas.  Together they work within the field of architecture, urbanism, research and development.

BIGB.I.G’s collective belief is

“A pragmatic utopian architecture that steers clear of the petrifying pragmatism of boring boxes and the naïve utopian ideas of digital formalism… By hitting the fertile overlap between pragmatic and utopia, we architects once again find the freedom to change the surface of our planet, to better fit contemporary life forms. In all our actions we try to move the focus from the small details to the BIG picture.”

Ingels is a large advocate of sustainable architecture and re-thinks the traditional – his work is playful and practical in many ways.  He has caught international attention for his thoughts and works, his most notable projects are:

  • VM Houses (2005), multi-family housing in V and M shaped apartment buildings;
  • Mountain Dwellings (2008), an extensive parking facility combined with terraced housing;
  • 8 House (2010), a large mixed-use housing development.
  • the REN Building, taking its form from the Chinese character for person 人 (“ren”) combining two buildings – one symbolic of mind and the other of body.

To learn more about how Bjarke Ingel’s brain works check out this collection of interviews and talks: 

_______________________________________________________________________________

Bjarke Ingels: 3 warp-speed architecture tales

Uploaded on Sep 15, 2009

Danish architect Bjarke Ingels rockets through photo/video-mingled stories of his eco-flashy designs. His buildings not only look like nature — they act like nature: blocking the wind, collecting solar energy — and creating stunning views at a TED talk http://www.ted.com

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AYE3w5TWHs

_______________________________________________________________________________

Gyre: Recent Work by BIG (Bjarke Ingels)

Published on Oct 10, 2012

Bjarke Ingels, Principal, BIG

“This is the country that invented surf and turf!,” noted BIG Principal Bjarke Ingels in New York magazine when describing his forthcoming residential project W57, “a European-style, low-rise apartment block encircling a courtyard, and a Manhattan tower-on-a-podium, yielding something that looks like neither and behaves like both.” Ingels returns to GSAPP to discuss his recent work.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdrK3G1nU3A

_______________________________________________________________________________

Architect Bjarke Ingels shares his philosophy on the design process

Uploaded on Jan 28, 2011

See what architect Bjarke Ingels has to say about the design process and the importance of print.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFo50kK1tg8

_______________________________________________________________________________

TEDxEast – Bjarke Ingels – Hedonistic Sustainability

Uploaded on May 17, 2011

May 9, 2011- Bjarke Ingels wows the audience with his wit and unlikely architectural solutions around the globe. Prepare to be dazzled.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogXT_CI7KRU

_______________________________________________________________________________

Bjarke Ingels on Sustainability

Uploaded on Aug 18, 2010Bjarke Ingels one on one talking to specific questions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKJRS5ZzkDk

_______________________________________________________________________________

Making architecture more like our dreams (Bjarke Ingels)

Published on Apr 20, 2012

CNN’s The Next List profiles innovative Danish architect Bjarke Ingels.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4WY8kcOfc0

_______________________________________________________________________________

Bjarke Ingels – Interview by Studio Banana TV

Uploaded on Dec 7, 2011

Studio Banana TV interviews Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, principal of BIG

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAkt49vu1ms

_______________________________________________________________________________

BIG ECH – Escher Tower

Uploaded on Jan 14, 2008

Bjarke Ingels describes how when asked to design a Scandinavian skyscraper with views and daylight in abundance, he chose a slim volume: a thin slab with minimal distance between the facades. The thin slab however is as structurally complicated as it is visually simple. It combines maximum wind pressure – the wide side – with minimal foothold – the short side, thus appearing as an unstable monolith.

The Escher Tower in response consists of 3 square towers merged into one. The central tower is straight as a dart, the two peripheral ones change places between ground floor and penthouse, causing the volume to flip 90 degrees. This provides maximal foothold for the hardest wind pressures.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYRCnCxxNkY&list=UUuzMH3B5EdlKWEFacVIXDeQ&index=10

_______________________________________________________________________________

If you ever have a chance to go to Bjarke Ingels’ talks GO –  he is so inspiring!

For more information check out these great reads in BIG

Big - Bjarke Ingels GroupYes Is More: An Archicomic on Architectural Evolution

BIG: Bjarke Ingels Group Projects 2001-2010 Big: Recent Project (English and Japanese Edition)

Berlin Architecture Resource

There is so much to learn about the Modern Architecture of Berlin,

our featured books…

     

Dutch Embassy In Berlin By Oma/Rem Koolhaas  by Rem Koolhaas, 2004

Sketches, drawings and models illustrate the design’s points of departure, and Koolhaas himself expounds upon the project’s context.  Everything you need to know and more about this fantastic example of modern architecture.

BUILDING BERLIN Vol 1.: The Latest Architecture in and out of the Capital by Chamber of Architects Berlin (ed.), 2012

The overview of more than 70 contemporary projects in and from Berlin is augmented by architecture essays by renowned authors and interviews.

there’s more


        

Modern Architecture in Berlin by Rolf Rave, 2009

With texts and images, the book presents 466 architectural works built from 1907 to the present day. The author’s choices support the greater intention to present what can now be deemed contemporary, typical, and exemplary about every period of Berlin’s diverse, irregular, and amazingly rich architectural history.

Berlin – The Architecture Guide: Updated (Architecture Guides) by Braun Publishing, 2012

This architectural guide provides expert guides to the capital city and largest metropolis in Germany.


Daniel Libeskind: Jewish Museum Berlin: Museum Building Guides by Daniel Libeskind, 2011

For Libeskind, a Polish Jew raised not far from Berlin who lost many relatives in the Holocaust, this extraordinary building was an intensely personal undertaking.


Holocaust Memorial Berlin: Eisenman Architects by Hanno Rauterberg, 2005

The enormity and scale of the horror of the Holocaust is such that any attempt to represent it by traditional means is inevitably inadequate . . . Our memorial attempts to present a new idea of memory as distinct from nostalgia . . . We can only know the past today through a manifestation in the present. Peter Eisenman

A Guide to Modern Architecture

Chicago Architecture Resources

There is much to learn about the modern architecture in Chicago,  for those who want to learn more…

Here are a few books to help you further appreciate Chicago’s modern architecture:

The Modern Wing: Renzo Piano and The Art Institute of Chicago

by James Cuno, Mr. Paul Goldberger, Joseph Rosa, Judith Turner 2009

The museum’s director, James Cuno, discusses the history of the commission, and Paul Goldberger writes on how this building fits into the larger context of Piano’s work—especially his many museum designs—as well as considers its positioning in a city celebrated for its architecture. Judith Turner provides exquisite architectural photographs, showing many nuanced details and views of the structure, while Joseph Rosa comments on her images and how they convey the beauty and sophistication of the building. Photographs by New York-based architectural photographer Paul Warchol complete the book.  Renzo Piano’s largest museum to date.

Millennium Park: Creating a Chicago Landmark (Historical Studies of Urban America)

by Timothy Gilfoyle 2006

Gilfoyle studied the history of downtown; spent years with the planners, artists, and public officials behind Millennium Park; documented it at every stage of its construction; and traced the skeins of financing through municipal government, global corporations, private foundations, and wealthy civic leaders. The result is a thoroughly readable and lavishly illustrated testament to the park, the city, and all those attempting to think and act on a monumental scale.

Chicago Architecture and Design

By Jay Pridmore, George A. Larson, Hedrich Blessing (Photographer) 2005

Looking at famous structures from the inside out, the book has won praise for its emphasis on the graceful interiors of Chicago’s finest buildings. The vivid text discusses the life and work of such towering figures as Daniel Burnham, Louis H. Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Mies van der Rohe, as well as that of the many lesser-known builders who have contributed to Chicago’s reputation as “an architect’s city.”

Bertrand Goldberg: Architecture of Invention (Art Institute of Chicago)

By Zoe Ryan, Alison Fisher, Elizabeth Smith, Sarah Whiting  2011

Bertrand Goldberg was a visionary Chicago architect whose designs for housing, urban planning, and industrial design made a distinctive mark in the modern era. In 1959, he conceived the plan for  the sixty-story Marina City residential towers, in the heart of downtown Chicago. He created a number of hospitals that offered a new paradigm for how patients and staff interacted within the space. Goldberg’s progressive designs also extended to schools, prefabricated structures, and furniture.

Chicago Makes Modern: How Creative Minds Changed Society

By Mary Jane Jacob 2012

Chicago is a city dedicated to the modern—from the skyscrapers that punctuate its skyline to the spirited style that inflects many of its dwellings and institutions, from the New Bauhaus to Hull-House. Despite this, the city has long been overlooked as a locus for modernism in the arts, its rich tradition of architecture, design, and education disregarded. Still the modern in Chicago continues to thrive, as new generations of artists incorporate its legacy into fresh visions for the future. Chicago Makes Modern boldly remaps twentieth-century modernism from our new-century perspective.

also see TIPS FOR VISITING CHICAGO MODERN ARCHITECTURE

A Guide to Modern Architecture

Toronto Architect Resource

Here are a few books to quench your thirst for insight on these great minds of Architects who work in Toronto:

KPMB

The Architect of Gardiner Museum, TELUS Centre for Performance and Learning,Canada’s National Ballet School, and Young Centre for the Performing Arts

The Architecture of Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg

The Architect of Bata Show Museum

The Architect of Bata Show Museum

In Search of a Soul

For more information about a selection of Architects who have worked in Toronto:

Architect of AGO

 The Architect of the Art Gallery of Ontario

Gehry Talks: Architecture and Process (Universe Architecture Series)
 
  Architect of OCADThe Architect of Sharp Centre for Design (OCAD)
  Will Alsop: The Noise
  

Architect of TD Canada Trust TowersThe Architect of TD Canada Trust Towers

Mies Van Der Rohe At Work
  

The Architect of BCE Place:The Architect of BCE Place

 Santiago Calatrava: Complete Works, Expanded Edition
 

The Architect of Roy Thomson HallThe Architect of Roy Thomson Hall

Arthur Erickson Critical Works
 
 Toronto guide book
 
 
 Toronto Architecture Guide Book