Editing your Architectural Travel Film

ICA Travel FilmLast week we covered tips on making a travel film, now we will cover how to edit all those short video clips and make a travel film.  Before you get a head of yourself and just dive into making your travel movie the following are some tips to ensure your movie is as interesting to others as it is to you.

Likely you have all the software you need already on your computer. Software such as iMovie (Mac Computers) and Windows Movie (PC Computers) will stich together individual videos, add music or other sounds and add credits. Open Shot and Light Works are alternate software options.  However consider the following tips before you get started.

Plan

Plan your movie by choosing the theme. There are a number of themes or methods to structure your movie for example your movie can be about one building and it can be set up to duplicate your experience or it can be a compilation of projects in the same city or by the same architect. You could make a series of short movies, each focusing on a different building typology. A long movie can be short snap shots of each building you visited in chronological order. The themes are endless, be creative.

Timeline / Storyboard

Make a timeline and/or storyboard. This sounds cumbersome and overkill however it can be a really basic doodle or point form notes but having a plan will save time in the long run and ensure you are making a concise movie that tells a story and is not just random video clips stitched together.

Movie Length

Determine how long your movie will be before you start. It is advisable to try and keep it under five minutes if you want to send and share your movie online so the file size is still manageable. Deciding the length of the movie also helps know how much to edit and whether you have enough video footage.

Music

Trying adding music to your movie, perhaps a song from the region you traveled or a song you listened to while traveling. Another possibility is to narrate the movie yourself so you are able to speak to the footage with stories or interesting facts. This is another reason why determining the movie length is coordinated to a certain song or narrative.

Narrate

If you like the idea of narrating you can take it a step further and add yourself to the movie by adding clips of yourself explaining the projects or sharing a story of your adventure between your travel footage. This is a great way to be included in the movie since you are normally behind the camera.

Edit

Edit your travel videos. In film production there is a “10 second rule” which means that every 10 seconds something interesting should happen. Any shaky or blurry footage should be cut out and scenes that are boring should be reduced. Try to keep the video concise and interesting for your viewers.

Compress

To make your movie ready to share on social media for a DVD, for your travel blog or sharing it online compress your movie file and name it clearly.

Practice Practice Practice

Lastly, things always look easier than they are so practice.

 

Here is my first attempt at making a travel film, I definitely need more practice.

Advertisements

Creating an Architectural Travel Film

Create your own travel movie from all your video clips to share is easier than you may think. Video can be the most amazing way to capture, relive and share your architectural experiences. There are a few advantages of video over photography such as the obvious sound, but video also replicates movement and time very differently than photography because it is capable of capturing what comes before and after. When visiting and documenting architecture although the subject matter is likely static the viewer is not and some buildings truly unfold and develop as you move through them, video is a perfect way to capture these experiences.

For the amateur film maker, like myself, your DSLR or point and shoot camera will have a video mode and that will be good enough.

Part 4 - Videos

Here are some tips on how to create your travel videos:

The idea

Have an idea of what you want your travel video(s) to be, for example do you want to create a series of videos of different architectural projects or will you compile a series of short snap shots of different buildings. Your video can take on themes similar to photography:

  • easily recognizable,
  • very objective
  • experimental,
  • detail based
  • snap shot of for comparison,
  • a story
  • artsy

Be sure your video has a beginning, middle and end.

Tripod

Use a tripod when possible, unlike still photography where shutter speeds can be increased to prevent blurry photos a video may be harder to prevent shaky footage. Many times a tripod is not permitted in public buildings so try to keep this in mind and use similar techniques for holding your camera as covered in the photography section.

10 second rule

In film production there is a “10 second rule” which means that every 10 seconds something interesting should happen. When filming architecture it may be difficult to get action is every scene. If your scene is uneventful you can edit the shot in post-production but at least you will have enough footage if you choose to add a fade or narration. An easy way to add action in your architectural film is to include people, they will give scale and show interaction with the space, also use light, the sun moves, and a long video can be speed up in post-production and be very dynamic.

Variety

It is a good idea to vary your scenes; this will keep it interesting and add interest to your travel movie. Try to capture less common vantage points, film the details and overall shots, ensure you have a variety of camera angles such as shooting low and high, on the side or on an angle. Remember, as per photography architecture reads better when photographed and filmed at chest height. All of this variety will help tell the story and keep your viewers interested.

Avoid

Try to avoid zooming in and out which will appear amateur and avoid panning your camera without a tripod since it will be very difficult to do it without shaking.

Separate audio

If you intend on using the audio captured in situ try to use separate audio devise such as your smart phone or tape recorder and leave the recorder running longer. This will let you match the studio to the edited video separately allowing you more control over the sound and no choppy sound bits. Ie: city traffic, people talking, religious chanting etc.

Equipment

Keep in mind that video will use up more space on your memory card and require more battery. It is recommended you buy an extra good quality memory card (they are not all created equal) and test the life of your battery, perhaps investing in an additional battery.

Observe

Pay attention when you are watching movies and film, there is architecture in most of them; notice how the camera angles are setup how the building is presented even if it is a backdrop. Often we do not notice the nuances of a craft until we try it ourselves.

This all sounds like a lot of work while in situ however a few seconds of film here and there can make for a fantastic short video but I would recommend some practicing at home or around your neighbourhood the first few times to become familiar with video if it is new to you.

Editing your Travel Film Blog post coming soon…

 

 

10 Architectural Photoshop Tips

Post production photo editing is fairly common, particularly if you plan to use the photography in your home, share it with friends and family or put it in a photo album.  I do all my post production in Adobe Photoshop but there is similar software available which will do many of the following tips.  If you shoot with RAW images you will have more ability to adjust the photo, these tips are applicable for standard JPEGs.

1.  Save as

Before I start any photo editing it is a good idea to save the photo with a different name so you can always go back to the original if you need it in the future.  Normally I just add a letter to the end of the photo name this way it is filed next to the original and I can easily find which photo is the original.

2.  Rotate

Sometimes your photo may need slight rotation because the strong lines of the building are too straight.  It is a good idea to make use of the guides to check on the alignment with the photo’s edge, just click on the rulers and drag.   Another method of adjusting the alignment is using the ruler tool.   Rotate – make sure the horizon is correct or vertical is perfect.

Drag the ruler along the line you wish to be vertical > Image Menu > Image Rotation > Arbitrary
Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba
image, Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba Spain, slight rotation counter-clockwise.  

3.  Crop

Composition is arguably the most important element of architectural photography.  I recommend cropping immediately so you are only working on and looking at the final photograph size and content.  Be careful to crop to a size that is proportional to what the photo will be used for, in other words, if you plan to print 4×6 photos the cropping should be in proportion or if you plan to upload to Instagram your photo needs to be a square proportion.

Spertus Museum

image, Spertus Museum Chicago, cropped into a square for instagram

 

4.  Defog

I only recently discovered this feature, which will save you lots of time mucking around with the curves and levels.  This function will remove the fog and haze in your photo and can make a big difference.  Below if the suggested amounts however sometimes the percentage needs to increase.

Filter Menu > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask > Enter Amount 14%, Radius 40 pixels, and Threshold 0 levels

Stone wall in Turkey

image, stone wall Turkey, unsharpen mask set to 40%/40/0

5.  Contrast

The Brightness/Contrast allows for changes to the tonal range of the entire photo. The brightness slider expands or decreases the highlights or shadows while the contrast slider expands or decreases the tonal values in the overall image.

Layer Menu > New adjustment layer > Brightness/Contrast > Click OK

Prudential (Guaranty) Building

image, Prudential (Guaranty) Building Buffalo, brightness decreased and contrast increased

6.  Hue and Saturation

This tool is easily fine tunes the hue and saturation your photos.  The Hue slider will alter the entire photos range of colour, this is good for effects such as adjusting the photo from colour to black and white or effects such as sepia.  The saturation slider is great for making your photos more vivid or muted.

Layer Menu > New adjustment layer > Hue/Saturation  > Click OK

Scottsdale Arabian Library

image, Scottsdale Arabian Library Arizona, saturation was decreased and hue adjusted slightly

7.  Levels

The levels tool uses the histogram of the photo to adjust the tonal range of its brightness and contrast which is accomplished by selecting the black, white and midtones will be on the histogram.  A rule of thumb is the histogram should typically extend the entire width of the graph; however the image should be previewed while making adjustments.

Layer Menu > New adjustment layer > Levels > Click OK

Museum of Civilization

image, Museum of Civilization Ottawa, slider was taken in for both the white and black based on histogram 

8.  Curves

Curves are an intimidating tool however it is one of the most powerful tools for adjusting your photography’s tonal range.  The graph begins with a straight diagonal line which represents the image’s tonality, the upper right are the highlights, the lower-left are the shadows.  Adjusting the RGB can be done in several ways, I encourage playing around with the tool to practice how it can be utilized.  I typically use this when photographing white interiors; it is sometimes difficult to achieve a crisp white when the majority of the content is white.

Layer Menu > New adjustment layer > Curves > Click OK

Guggenheim Museum

image, Guggenheim Museum New York City, curve adjusted to increase the highlights and make building more white

9.  Shadows / Highlights

Unlike many of the other tools in photoshop the Shadows / Highlight tool will adjust strong backlighting or areas washed out from over exposure separate from the rest of the picture.  Practice adjusting the different slider options to see how they will affect your photo.  Be sure to click on ‘Show more options’ to get full use of the tool.  Be careful to use this tool lightly since it can easily result in an artificial

Filter Menu > Convert for Smart Filters > Click OK > Image Menu > Adjustments > Shadows / Highlights

The Beekman

image, The Beekman New York City, the shadows and highlight sliders were adjusted to suit (some deletion of adjacent buildings using the clone tool)

10.  Correct Morie Effect

Moiré pattern typically occurs when a repetitive lines or dots occur in a tight pattern and thus create a third pattern.  for example, horizontal or vertical wood slats, frit patterns on glass, sun shades, fences, and so on, the repetition exceeds the camera’s sensor resolution.  How much morie effect you will encounter in your photography has a lot to do with your camera and lens design, it is a common issue with digital SLRs.   A few tips to avoid the issue while shooting is to increase the pixels per square inch, shoot in RAW,  change the angle or distance you are shooting from.  If morie effect still occurs it can be corrected or reduced in post production.

Use the Lasso tool to select the morie pattern > Filter Menu > Blur > Gaussian Blur (do not to use the defog tool it will likely more the morie pattern worse)

New Amsterdam Pavilion

image, New Amsterdam Pavilion New York City, increased Gaussian blur to 1.4 pixels

 

These tools all have their place in post production photography but it is important to to learn when each tool is needed, you will not need to use all of them.  It is also best to spend time to perfect your photographing skills to reduce the amount of post production work necessary,  No Photoshop work is the goal.  So do not over do it and try to use these tools to subtly help improve your photography not drastically alter it.

 

A few ways architecture can come to you.

There are many reasons why traveling to visit architecture in distant cities can be difficult, the cost of travel has gone up significantly, it is hard to get time off work, you have obligations, you just don’t like to travel or you can’t afford it.  In my case I recently had a baby thus realizing this is going to change how I travel and how much I travel as much as I didn’t want to believe it before.  So I have been thinking about all the ways I can still get my architecture fix without travel and possibly without even leaving my house.  Here are my suggestions:

Books

 

I love books, let me clarify, I love big coffee table books.  There are thousands of beautiful modern architecture books available with amazing photos and lots of information about architecture and their architects.  Many books are compilation of architecture projects, Phaidon Press always creates awesome modern architecture books.  My favorite recent book is The Phaidon Atlas of 21st Century World Architecture which features more than 1000 of the finest architecture completed since the year 2000 from around the world.  And now that I think about it you don’t need to leave your house for books anymore either.

Click here for some more book suggestions.

 

 

Magazines

For those who like to stay in the know regarding new architectural projects, awards, news, and events magazines are just the thing. They are also idea for flipping through while having your morning coffee, they are easy to digest, portable and not precious objects so they can be recycled when you are done.  You can also subscribe to magazines so you don’t even need to think about it.  Here are some good ones.

           

Digital Books and Magazines

Although there is nothing like a tangible book I am very fond of all things digital.  If you have a Kobo, Kindle, or tablet you can purchase digital architecture books or magazines so if you are the type that doesn’t like a lot of stuff or don’t have a lot of space this is perfect.  Plus you can order them anytime of day and get it instantly.

Architecture Documentaries

I always say that because architecture is three dimensional it should be viewed in person to understand the true space and to grasp the real nature of the architecture HOWEVER the next best thing is film.  There are some outstanding Documentaries about architecture where you can learn about a series of projects by one architect or learn a ton about one building.  Click here for a link to a bunch of architecture documentaries worth getting.

               

Lectures

Check out your local architecture college / university they often run architectural lecture series through the school year bringing in some really fascinating architects to speak about their work.  I have seen Elizabeth Diller, Tadao Ando, Craig Dykers from Snohetta, Kazuyo Sejima from SANNA,and so forth.  Listening to the architect speak of the challenges, the inspiration and reasoning is priceless and I have found very inspiring.  Other places to learn about lectures or events is in magazines, also check you local architecture associations website there is usually a list of events.

Youtube

Youtube is not new but I feel like I have only recently realized its true value when it comes to architecture.   There are countless interviews with architects and short documentaries about buildings on youtube, they vary in length and context but they are similar to lectures in that you can get the real scoop on process and design, challenges and my favourite is seeing how different the office environments are.  I have a few blog posts that have several youtube links, see below, or you can just search youtube for whatever or whomever you are interested in.

Learn more about Bjarke Ingels (B.I.G)

Interviews with Zaha Hadid

Websites

There are lots of great architecture websites.  I list a bunch in this blog post:

 12 awesome ARCHITECTURE websites

 

These are a few ways to have architecture come to you.

Architectural travel on the cheap

From the plane

Gone are the days of cheap travel, I cannot believe how expensive flights and hotels have become.  Not long ago we could get half-way around the world for what now seems like peanuts.  But for us curious explorers we cannot stop traveling and visiting our favorite architectural landmarks so we must find other ways to save. 

Here are my travel budget tips to offset the costs of traveling.

(from a float plane on my way Salmon fishing in the Queen Charlotte Islands, BC)

Do the Research

Before you leave be sure to research the architecture, monuments, museums and towers you plan to visit, jot down the entry fees and compare it to your budget.  If the entry fees are adding up you may need to prioritize (also see 5 TIPS FOR VISITING ARCHITECTURE).  This will be important to help find savings in the tips below.

The Budget

Budgets aren’t my favorite thing either but here is a quick and easy formula:

  1. Start with how much you want or can afford to spend on you trip I would start with that
  2. Subtract all your transportation costs (flights, trains tickets, bus ticket etc.)
  3. Calculate how many days you will need accommodation and do a quick estimate of your average accommodation budget is
  4. You should allow for food and spending money – this is going to vary greatly depending on what country you are going to be.

Remember this is a starting point to make sure things don’t go off track to much, accommodation/ food and spending money is an average number so if one day you are going to a number of monuments but the day after you plan to hang out at the beach it should average out.

Flexibility

When you have flexibility and /or time you can usually find better deals on flights and hotels in the offseason – this will save you money on flights and hotels that you can use towards entry fees and day tours.

We all have to Eat

I am a foodie but sometimes on travels food is fuel and not the main event so what I like to do is try and save money on one meal a day.

Breakfast:  Often I travel with food, a few protein bars or granolar bars because they are easy to transport  or I will go to the market and get some fresh fruit or a treat from the bakery while I am out and about and have that in my hotel room with coffee, if there is a coffee machine in the room.  This is a relaxing and quick way to have breakfast in the morning, often while I review the plan for the day.

Lunch:  if lunch is my money saving meal I will try to have a bigger breakfast and grab a snack on the go midday.  Street food is always my favorite but that will depend on what city you are in. Also if you are having a big breakfast and an early dinner you may skip lunch all together.  If you are close to market grab some fresh fruits and vegetable which are hard to get enough of when traveling.

Istanbul Streetfood 3 Istanbul Streetfood 1 Istanbul Streetfood 2 (variety of street food in Istanbul, Turkey)

Dinner:  this is a bit trickier to save for, but possible, ask your concierge for recommendations and try to stay out of the tourist areas which are normally expensive and not that great.

Some general tips:  If coffee is super pricey, my experience in Tokyo, I have gone to the store and purchased some instant coffee to have in the hotel.

With all these ways to save I do not recommend trying to save a dollar on water.  Drink safe reliable water especially in hot places, if you are in Rome and it is over 40 degrees Celsius it is important to stay hydrated, try grabbing a big bottle of water from the grocery store instead of the stands in front of the Coliseum.

Citypass

Because you have been diligent and done a ton of research prior to your trip you will know which sites you plan to visit and the entry fee prices, but many cities offer a ‘citypass’ (the name of the pass vary from city to city) which basically bundles a bunch of popular city sights for a flat rate.  This is perfect for those who plan to go to enough of the sights on the list.  Many of these value packages offer features such as line-bypass or discounts for other places, stores or shows.  Here are a few examples:

MADRID Tourist Card:  http://www.madridcard.com/en/inicio

TORONTO Citypass:  http://www.citypass.com/toronto

NEW YORK Citypass:  http://www.citypass.com/new-york

BERLIN Welcome Card:  http://www.visitberlin.de/en/welcomecard

To find if the cities you are traveling to have a citypass I typically would Google the city name and the phrase ‘tourist card’, the officially tourist website of the city/country you are going should also have some advertising for it.

Museums

Louvre LensMany Museums and Galleries offer pricing for General Admission, the Temporary Exhibit and typically another price for both.  You can save some money by viewing only the Permanent Collection, it is all new stuff if you have never been there before and if you are really just interested in the architecture you will see the main spaces and most of the building without the up charge on the Temporary Exhibit.

Bilbao Guggenheim Museum

Also try to take advantage of the time where it is free entry, most museums and galleries do offer this so if it works with your schedule try to take advantage but I must warn you it will likely be busy.

louvre-museum

Buy your tickets in advance, sometimes there is a discount for purchasing ahead of time, for some museums and art galleries you need to book a time anyways so I would recommend always looking into this as part of your research.

Tourist Trap

Prada by Herzog & de Meuron Architekten

Prada by Herzog & de Meuron Architekten

Don’t get sucked into the tourist trap of feeling like you need to visit every monument, museum, gallery, ruin and historic something rather which all have entry fees.  Pick and choose which you actually want to go to, perhaps the Arc de Triomphe is awesome enough from the ground floor and you don’t need to go up, the view is pretty cool that was just an example. If you don’t find a bunch of ruins that interesting because history is not your thing you are better to check out an awesome Square or Piazza and have an ice cream or go shopping in some super trendy boutiques.  Don’t feel like you need to hit the top ten listed in some travel guide.

Sleep on the Go

ways_to_sleep

You can save a night’s accommodation if you book an overnight train or flight rather than spending the entire day commuting only to arrive to your destination just to sleep.  If you plan to do this bring a small inflatable pillow, ear plugs or load your iPod with some relaxing white noise, an eye mask and a light blanket.  Be sure to keep you valuables safe, I have sat on top of my passport and money on a few train rides, and try to keep your luggage in easy viewing distance, better a few seats in front of you than behind you.

Discounts

If you are young, a student or a senior you got it made for discounts.  Almost everything offers a discount from public transit to popular landmarks; if it is not advertised ask if there is a discount.  Some reward cards or membership cards offer discounts to hotels and attractions, it’s worth reviewing the offers before booking your trip.

Transportation

Kyoto on BikeTry to walk as much as possible, take public transit or rent a bike over taxis.  You can see the city the best by foot and cover a lot of terrain in a bike.  Do what the locals do to get around, ie:  in Kyoto renting a bike for a few days was perfect, very convenient and flexible, in most cities I take the metro, in Istanbul I saved a ton if money taking the regular commuting ferry up the Bosporus River rather than an expensive tourist cruise, you miss the commentary but the scenery is the same for only a few dollars.

(Kyoto, Japan by bike)

Cash

Try not to exchange money or withdrawal money too frequently, most exchange centers have bad exchange rates and banks can charge fees for each withdrawal (learned this the hard way).  Try to change as much money as you feel comfortable carrying before you leave.  I recommend not keeping all your money in one place no matter how much you have, I always try to have an emergency bill or two tucked somewhere no one would go ie: shoes, bra, sock (gross I know but I would not want to be completely stranded somewhere without even a way to get back to the hotel).   Before you leave it may be worth a quick internet search of where a good place to get cash is or ask your concierge.

Whats Included

It shocks me beyond words that in this day and age free WiFi is not standard in every hotel but many hotels do charge.  It will be beneficial and save you time and money to have free WiFi access with your accommodations, it will be easy to contact friends and family, look up venues you plan to go to, and allows more freedom to change your itinerary and research new things on the fly.

Complimentary breakfast will also save you money if you take full advantage and have a healthy size breakfast you may not to have lunch at all.

More Time – Less Places

Cherry Blossoms

I know I know – there are so many places and so little time but if you cram in too much you won’t enjoy it anyways and be paying to be in an airport, on a train/bus for half your trip.  So stop and smell the roses, it will be easier on your pocket book too.

a happy groupie is an architecture GROUPIE

So where is the architecture?

Believe it or not there is architecture everywhere.

It is likely you will not need to travel across an ocean to get to see beautiful buildings and design.  I read book many years ago called Outside Lies Magic by John R. Stilgoe, I thought the book was only semi-interesting but I loved its premise.  In short Stilgoe was suggesting that there is inspiration everywhere when you become acutely aware of everyday places and observe the ordinary elements around you.  The book covered some mundane stuff but what I took from it was the idea that there is design and architecture everywhere as long as you are looking for it.

Apartment Building  Herzog de Mueron inspiration

Apartment Building, Basel in Switzerland by Herzog and De Mueron, did inspiration come from the road sewer grate?
 

So I suggest that architecture is not far, it could be in your backyard.

Next time you are out on a walk or taking a bike ride – observe the buildings around you.  Most people take their everyday environments for granted and no longer see beauty and design right in front of them.  I sometimes bringing a camera which helps me focus and pay extra attention to the magical moments and minute details.

Iconic architecture can be a short road trip away.  There are many wonderful projects that are not in a city centre but a bit off the beaten track – they could be a day trip or weekend excursions.  These projects are great excuses to just get away for a day or two.

These are some of my architecture road trips:

Fallingwater

Fallingwater by Frank Lloyd Wright in Pennsylvania, a spectacular building and a memorable experience (6 hour road trip from Toronto).

Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre

Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre by Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden architects in Osoyoos, British Columbia, I had read about the rammed earth wall and wanted to see it in person (5 hour road trip from Vancouver)

Ronchamp

La Chapelle de Ronchamp Notre Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier in Ronchamp France, had been on my bucket list since architecture school (a couple hour drive from Basel)

La Tourette Church by Le Corbusier

Sainte Marie de La Tourette by Le Corbusier outside Lyon, this spiritual convent was inspirational and spiritual (less than an hour outside Lyon, France)

Felsen Therma Vals

Therme Vals by Peter Zumthor in Vals, Switzerland, I was lucky to get into this thermal spa, architecture which touches all the senses (about 2.5 hours from Zurich)

The Bauhaus in Dessau Germany by Walter Groupius

The Bauhaus in Dessau Germany by Walter Groupius

The Bauhaus Dessau by Walter Gropius, Dessau Germany, any modernist would love to visit the school where modern architecture was born (1.5 hours outside Berlin)

ChurchOfLight

Church of Light by Tadao Ando in Ibaraki, Japan, I missed this project because I got very turned around a lost so it is still on my bucket list (just over an hour from Kyoto)

Suprising architecture

Vitra Design Museum, projects by Zaha Hadid, Herzog & de Meuron, Frank Gehry, Tadao Ando, SANAA and more Weil am Rhein Germany, a campus of architecture (less than 30min from Basel)

a happy groupie is an architecture GROUPIE

visit www.archgroupie.com the architecture directory

modern architecture is not just for architects

Greatbatch Pavilion by Toshiko MoriIt is a misconception that only architects or those educated in design can appreciated, understand and have an opinion on modern and contemporary architecture.

Left, The Eleanore and Wilson Greatbatch Pavilion, Visitor Center for Frank Lloyd Wright’s Darwin Martin House by Toshiko Mori Architect

Architecture is created for everyone.

to be used, lived in, visited, loved, hated, talked about, create a mood, guide us, challenge us, move us, protect us.

Architecture is all around us and can be appreciated at many levels and in a multitude of ways.  Let me use wine as an analogy.  IMG_0767Wine connoisseurs know a lot about wine, they know about the different grape varieties, where they grow, what each plant and grape looks like.  They understand the process of converting those grapes to wine, all the science and technique required, how many people are involved how many years it takes.  A wine connoisseur will know to look and smell the wine before tasting and be able to notice and articulate the subtle differences and undertones in a glass of wine using vocabulary such as robust and angular.

Does all this mean that anyone cannot enjoy a glass of wine?  Absolutely Not

It just means that the wine connoisseur will experience the wine differently have more background and likely read more from the experience but it is not a requirement to enjoy the wine and have an opinion about it.

Architecture is just like wine (minus the side effects).

If you are an architect, an architecture student or an architecture groupie you have studied and trained to read architecture and thus will see details and formulate an opinion perhaps quicker, you will notice more, know what to look for, have the vocabulary to speak about it but

anyone can have an opinion about architecture

Darwin Martin HouseBoth modern architecture and historic architecture can be good or bad.  Just because a building is old doesn’t make it good architecture and just because a building is new doesn’t make it bad architecture, and visa-versa.  Use your own judgment, next time you are looking at architecture try to make a definitive decision about whether you like it or not and why.

Left, The Darwin Martin House by Frank Lloyd Wright

Remember there is no wrong answer.

Also visit www.archgroupie.com   modern and contemporary architecture – by location

Related articles:

architecture JARGON: one

architecture JARGON: two

How do we EXPERIENCE ARCHITECTURE

Visiting Modern Architecture

How to Plan your Architectural Travel

Canova Plaster Cast Museum

I love planning my architectural explorations, for me it is almost as fun as the traveling, however I recognize not everyone feels this way, it can be a lot of work particularly if you want to see it all and don’t want to miss a thing.  I really hate getting back from a great city and missing an amazing architectural project because I didn’t know it was there!

When I went to Venice I was ill prepared and missed a bunch of Carlo Scarpa’s architecture, I have heard his work is amazing from friends and wish I could have experienced it in person (now his work is on my bucket list).  So to prevent this I have outlined my system of travel planning in hopes you will never miss out on any architectural experiences.

Choosing an architecturally rich city

If you haven’t already decided where you want to go one of the methods I use to determine which cities to travel to is to first ask myself and my travel companion: what time of year I want to travel, how long the trip will be and what do we want to gain from the experience.  Most people like to travel where the weather is reasonably good so that will help narrow down where you want to go depending on the time of year.  How long you have will narrow down how far you can go and how many cities you can reasonably see.  There are so many wonderful and exciting cities so once the list has been narrowed down do image searches and talk to people who have been to the places you are interested in – this will definitely help to make your final determination.  If you are like me there are just too many places and not enough time and/or money.

banner

Finding the architecture

Once you have determined the city or cities you are going to visit you can begin to find the architecture.  Research cannot be overstated – the more you do before you leave the less you miss and the more you see!  I always search for as many architectural gems as I can by doing the following:

  • Refer to architecture magazines and books
  • Talk to friends and family about your travel plans they may offer suggestions and tips, most people love to reminiscent about the things they have seen and places they go.  Friends and family are usually a reliable source because they are unbiased and the information and experience is first hand.
  • Image searches, try different keywords, when you see something you like save the picture and try to get the name from the website – the pictures are important because a list of building names can get all confusing after so much research
  • Visit www.archgroupie.com which is our architecture directory of architectural gems organized by city so you are able to skip all this research but if we haven’t covered the city yet – feel free to write us and let us know.
  • Consult various architecture websites, check out this blog post:  12 Awesome ARCHITECTURE websites

Keep an ongoing list of everything you find.  This can be done on your computer, in a sketchbook, on a smartphone app such as Evernote, or all of the above.  Whichever method works best for you, we will organize the information in the next step.

Get Organized

When you believe you got it all or have run out of time for researching begin to vet through the information.  I always rank my researched architecture list into three categories:

1. Absolutely will not leave this city without seeing this building…MUST SEE

2. Really want to see

3. I will live if I don’t see that building

4. Not that interested

Now research the essential information from the top three categories: address, hours, entry fee, tour times, website links, etc.  Make reservations, get tickets if required and prepare anything you may need to visit the building.

Map it out

smartphone 5

There are lots of ways to map out the architecture, you can use Google maps, print a map and label it with a corresponding legend or mark up your travel guide book.  It is important to map it so you can better prepare an itinerary.  Mapping will also help you know when a building is hard to get to or just next door.   I like to always group sites by geography so I do not waste precious time traveling back and forth around the city – on a map it is easy to tell how close or far apart buildings are.

Architecture GROUPIE is creating maps so you can skip all this work too.

Itinerary

Visiting Modern Architecture

Make an itinerary, I have never been too keen on a day by day / hour by hour itinerary but many buildings are not open every day and if you are not careful you can miss out on some great sites because you weren’t organized or well researched.

Based on your “MUST SEE” architecture list outline what days they are open and closed to see if a conflict will occur.  Use your itinerary loosely to figure out how you will get around and what you plan to see and do… be sure to leave flexibility for example if the weather is rainy I like to check out some indoor venues such as a museum.

Documents

It is important to let people know where you are just in case.  I create a small spread sheet with the important information of where I will be and give it to a family member, be sure to include any information you may need as well, such as confirmation numbers, see example below.  Another option is to enter all this information into a sharable calendar such as Tripit, I have not used it yet but plan to give it a try on my next travel adventure.

 Date  City and Flight Info

Hotel (name, address, phone number)

Confirmation Number

Include your email address and phone number at the bottom.

Also it is important to have a copy of important travel documents such as your passport, visa etc.  Save these on your smartphone, tablet or print them out.  I would recommend putting all this important stuff on the cloud (Dropbox Google Drive, etc…) or you can just email it to yourself in case something happens to your device, this way you just need any computer with internet to access this sensitive information and its one less thing to care around. 

Budget

If you are on a budget be sure to take note of ticket prices and free offers.  Some buildings can be viewed from the outside if the tours are really expensive and it isn’t on your “MUST SEE” list.

Also visit:  5 TIPS FOR VISITING MODERN ARCHITECTURE ON A BUDGET

Just remember you will likely never go back to these cities and see these places again so don’t go overboard and miss out on great architecture.

Now all you need to do is pack…  Happy Travels

travel guides - blog

A happy groupie is an architecture GROUPIE – check out the digital maps to save you all this work

tips for visiting modern architecture

are you an architecture groupie?

Years ago I realized…

I am an architecture GROUPIE

thinking, planning, researching and traveling to different cities all over the world visiting modern and contemporary architecture.

The architecture varied in age, size, use, materials and often left me speechless.  There is so much beauty and inspiration in Architecture and I just wanted to see it all.  I still do.

Krematorium - Berlin Architecture   Concilliation Chapel - Berlin   Bundestrag im Reichstag - Berlin Architecture

While I was in Berlin, a Studies Abroad during Grad school, I sought great architecture out.  The old stuff was easy to find but it was the modern and contemporary projects that were the real challenge to find and that was what I was most interested in – I was determined.  So with my detective skills found these buildings and visited dozens upon dozens of amazing projects.  Soon my tours and architectural visits caught on and friends (mostly architecture students) asked me for my modern and contemporary architecture address book.  Because I love architecture and love to share it I not only gave them the address book but advised which where ‘must sees’ and when to go and how to get there.

This went on for years…

Finally I realized I am not the only architecture groupie so I decided this information needed to be shared with all the architecture groupies of the world.

architecture groupie logo for blog

Architecture GROUPIE.com was officially launched in July 2012.  The website’s goal is simple: to locate modern and contemporary architecture for you so you can get to it.  I have carefully edited the information to include an image, the architect, the year it was completed, a weblink and of course the address and closest transit station.

ar·chi·tec·ture:  is the product of planning, designing and constructing buildings which are often perceived as cultural symbols and works of art.
group·ie:  is an ardent fan of a celebrity who follows these celebrities to have sexual relations with them.
ar·chi·tec·ture·group·ie:  is an ardent fan of the celebrity starchitect** who seeks orgasmic pleasure from beautifully planned, designed and constructed buildings, traveling the globe visiting these works of art.
** used to describe architects whose celebrity and critical acclaim have transformed them into idols of the architecture world and may even have given them some degree of fame amongst the general public. (thanks Wikipedia)

So what building’s make the list?  I have tried to be as impartial as I can, including only completed modern and contemporary architecture.  Private residence or projects with sensitive programs have been excluded to respect the privacy of those who inhabit them.  Buildings which are difficult to get to are also limited because going on a wild goose chase for one project is not always the best use of one’s time as well as any projects I could not confidently locate.  There are exceptions to these guidelines but this is the fundamental parameters of the archGROUPIE modern and contemporary architecture directory.

for ADs 2 for ADs 1Currently the directory includes the following cities:  London, Basel, Weil Am Rhein, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Tokyo, Berlin, Rotterdam, and Toronto.

but the directory is continuing to grow and now includes maps of selected cities.

A Guie to Modern ArchitectureThis blog has been added to offer helpful tips and information which has come from my experiences and research.  My hope is that this website will help other people see these projects and give more popularity to modern and contemporary architecture amongst the general population.also check out architecture GROUPIE stuff & things  stuff & things

travel guides - blog check out these digital inexpensive architecture travel guides

Computer Modeling changed the path of architecture

guggenheim_bilbao Gehry_Technologies“the computer is a tool, not a partner – an instrument for catching the curve, not for inventing it”  Frank Gehry

Computers are changing architecture – some believe it is for the worst, other for the better, either way the transformation is unfolding and modern and contemporary architecture is made of different materials, formed into new shapes and much more experimental than it has ever been.  This is an exciting time to be visiting new architecture; current architects are pushing the envelope – literally.

So how does computer software actually change the face of architecture?

The computer software that has allowed for these architectural opportunities is called Building Information Modeling more commonly referred to simply as BIM.  BIM is intelligent model-based digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of building elements.  The digital model becomes a shared wholistic and comprehensive information resource of the facility throughout its entire lifecycle – Yikes!  In short architects are now building complex building forms in 3-dimensions rather than only working in plan, section and elevation (essentially flattening the building like a cubist painting). The benefit is that the complexity is computed and rationalized by the computer and the complicated information can be sent directly to manufacturers and contractors for production.

Many people believe that this type of technology is very new however this technology dates back almost 30 years.  A Hungarian company, Graphisoft, launched a 3D CAD program for Mac in 1984, eventually recognized globally in 1987 under Graphisoft’s ‘Virtual Building’ concept, now known as ArchiCAD, almost simultaneously Autodesk released 2D AutoCAD, unfortunately the popularity of computer drafting grew – until now.  The term BIM was used loosely until Autodesk popularized it in more recent years.

We are reaching a tipping point in architecture similar to the renaissance when drawing perspective altered the way architecture was designed, created and perceived.  The future of architecture is entering a new chapter, an exciting chapter defying normal architectural rules and conventions are questioned re-examined and pushed to its limits.  BIM connects architects and projects from opposite sides of the world allowing amazingly complex projects to be built within a fraction of the time pre-computer architecture.  Think back not too long ago to the Sydney Opera House, the project was awarded to Jorn Utzon in 1957, the first of three back to back phases began in 1959 and finished in 1973.  The iconic architectural landmark took 16 years from conception to completion.  Compared to Bilbao Guggenheim which was awarded to Frank Gehry in 1992 began construction in 1993 and was complete in 1997 – 5 years later.

NRS12706, 2/8645A   Sydney Opera House Detail Drawing   Sydney Opera House

Sydney Opera House above, Bilbao Guggenheim below

Gehry Sketch - Guggenheim  Guggenheim Bilbao by Frank Gehry  guggenheim computer model

Have you ever wondered what the drawings for Bilbao Guggenheim by Frank Gehry look like?  In fact Gehry has invented his own software to accomplish his designs to get his projects realized

Complex connection, organic shapes, and playful forms are all possible architects have more freedom and we have more to be astonished by.  Some examples of contemporary architecture taking full advantage of what computer modeling can achieve.

The Beijing National Stadium (aka the bird’s nest) by Herzog & de Meuron was completed in 2008 for the Beijing Olympics, below.  A complex façade constructed of a double-curved roof of woven steel box beams sized at 1meter squared.  The geometries where multifaceted – an impossible design to achieve and construct within the five year time frame they had.

National Stadium  Bird's Nest

Jean Nouvel’s Louvre Abu Dhabi in Saadiyat Island, Abu Dhabi, UAE is still in construction however computer generated design was pivotal in creating the effect Nouvel was looking for, below.  The most notable architectural feature is the perforated dome roof with a pattern of shadows – more than 1000 tender drawings and datasheets were required to describe and analyze the lattice dome.  More than one hundred thousand structural and architectural members were rationalized and assembled using the computer model.

Louvre Museum Abi Dhabi

Riverside Museum in Glasgow by Zaha Hadid is a Museum of Transport.  The complex form was created, studied, and fabricated with the computer model. Most of Hadid’s work, if not all, uses the computer to achieve organic and unusual forms.  Her architecture is unlike any others and the experience within each building is unique and memorable.

Zaha Hadid Computer modeling      BIM zaha-hadid Riverside Museum Riverside Museum in Glasgow Riverside Museum in Glasgow Diagram Riverside Museum in Glasgow Construction

The discussion of computer modeling and its effect of contemporary architecture is overwhelming however the opportunities that have been created for more exciting and intriguing architecture is yet to be created.

package your architectural memories

So we take these extraordinary architectural journeys and visit inspirational places and but when we get home it seem almost immediately to be like a dream that went by in a flash.  Before you begin planning your next trip take some time and package your architectural memories.

Make the most of your experiences and re-live them by sharing with family and friends.  This is what I do to keep the inspiration and memories around me or at my finger tips.

Scrapbook / Box it

It sounds nerdier then it is.  I try to keep all the tickets stubs, receipts, plane boarding passes, train tickets and even subway cards from my trips.  When I return home I usually put them all in a scrapbook or well labeled box.  It is surprising how much you forget until you open up the scrapbook or box and see a ticket stub to a museum or tour and flooded with memories of the day and experience.  I also like to look back to see how much I paid for things like flights or dinners and it makes it much easier when friends ask me what I did when I was there.  It is also nice to see how different the each scrapbook can be, ticket stubs and receipts in different languages, little notes and things you pick up along your travels can vary immensely.  The scrapbook doesn’t need to be beautiful – just make sure the paper has a heavy weight, I like paperclips for pamphlets and maps, staples and glue work well also.

Scrapbook3 Scrapbook2 Scrapbook1  Box-it

Photobook

Some of us will have taken thousands of digital pictures which will go into our computers never to be seen again. Create a photobook that looks like a magazine, the days of the old 4×6 picture album with plastic sleeves is over.  There are much better photobooks that are so easy to make online.  I have used the Blacks photobooks but there are lots of companies that provide similar services.

Now that we take hundreds, even thousands of photos on our trips picking the right pictures can be a bit of work.  An easy way to sift through all of this is to make a ‘BEST OF…’ folder.  Then go through all the pictures and any one you like COPY into the ‘BEST OF…’ folder, you do not need to be too picky at this point, if you are really thorough this is when you can delete any out of focus shots or just really bad ones.  When you are done the first round go to the ‘BEST OF…’ folder and see how many pictures you have.  Keep narrowing it down removing photos that are repetitive, try to get the essence of the trip.  Depending on how big you want to make your photobook is how many photos you should have in this folder.

Slideshow

Using the photos from your ‘BEST OF…’ folder you can easily make this into a slideshow.  There is so much software available to do this I won’t go through all of them, keep in mind you can add any videos you took, include local music, add captions and so on.  Be creative and have fun.  You can play your slideshow on your TV or computer; you can send it to your friends and family online. I recommend no more than 200 pictures – this is even pushing it for the average attention span – they weren’t there so they are only so interested.  Also be sure that the pictures you use in a slideshow are not just of you with a landmark in the background, my brother and his girlfriend did this and watching a slideshow essentially of just them was pretty boring and we have never let them live it down (all in good fun).

Journal it

Travel Journal

Writing and/or drawing in a journal is so gratifying for your future reminiscing.  I highly encourage you to spend a few minutes everyday on the trip and jot down a few things you were thinking throughout the day.  But what do you write, here are some ideas:  the most surprising or best part of the day, what really inspired you and why, what you thought was disappointing.  If you don’t’ like to spend time doing this when you could be out and about take advantage of the train rides or waiting in the airport, there is always some downtime that can be better utilized. These short notes are priceless and you can keep them private or share them.

Showcase

It is always nice to surround yourself with memories of the places you have been and also a way to decorate your home.  Here are some suggestions of ways to display your photos which I have done.

Collage

Print 4×6 photos and collage them together, this is inexpensive and a fun home project.  The image above is a small portion of my photos of Japan, if you make the collage big enough it has lots of impact and can tell the story of your trip and all the places you have been.

Photos on the cheap       Photos on the cheap 2

This image are photos I printed on my home printer and then spray glued each photo on foamcore, using an x acto knifecut off the boarders and mounted them on the wall using a small piece of double sided tape (be careful to use a tape that can come off the wall easily).

Photo Series

A series of photos is also nice, the image above are two photos from Turkey I sent to be printed and then mounted them in frames I purchased.  This is more expensive, the cost will depend on the frame and type of printing you choose.

Party

Often when I return from a trip I am eager to share what I have seen and learned with anyone who will listen.  Returning from a vacation doesn’t mean the fun is over – have a party themed and inspired by it.  When I returned home from Peru I decided to have a bunch a girlfriends over and host a ‘Peruvian night’ we all brought a Peruvian dish, drank pisco sours and I ran my slideshow with the native music playing.  It was all very fun and relaxed and because a few of them had already been there it was a trip down memory lane for them too.

A happy groupie is an architecture GROUPIE

Try HDR for your Architectural Photography

HDR is an awesome photo technique so if you haven’t tried it in your architectural photography you should. 

I am going to give you the 101 on HDR. 

High Dynamic Range (HDR) is a post-processing method of taking a series of images, combining them, and adjusting the contrast ratios to do things that are virtually impossible with a single aperture and shutter speed.

HDR compensates for this loss of detail of overexposed and underexposed areas in a photo by taking multiple pictures at different exposure levels and stitching them together to produce a picture that is representative in both dark and bright areas in computer software during post-production.

The reason HDR creates such amazingly realistic photos is because a single image uses only one shutter speed and one aperture setting however the human eye does not process images the same way.  Your eyes move and adjust the light as required and does a lot to process an image accurately.  So even with the best equipment getting an accurate representation of what you saw is difficult.  HDR stitches all the images together – a trick to accurately represent and image.  Many times HDR is exaggerated in post-production – this effect is no for everyone or appropriate for all pictures so balancing the effect with your desired outcome is where the challenge lies.  Some examples of HDR from www.stuckincustoms.com:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What you need:

1.  MANUAL CAMERA

A camera which can be put into manual mode, likely a DSLR or SLR, because you will need to be able to adjust your exposure (I have the Canon 4Ti which is an inexpensive camera with lots of features).  Most DSLRs have Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB) which allows you to set the exposure easily and the photo will take the photos and adjust automatically.  If you are not sure check your camera’s manual.  Some of the newest cameras have an HDR feature but this does all the work for you and you will have no control over the final output – do a comparison to see if you are happy with the results.  Also, I would recommend taking the photos in RAW+JPEG but if you are low on memory or can’t shoot in the RAW it is fine (Shooting in RAW just gives more post production control).

2.  TRIPOD

A tripod is important to maintain the exact same shot with different exposures.  There are so many tripods out there and the price range is significant the Manfrotto 410 is an awesome tripod because of all the leveling features and stability but there are less expensive tripods on the market.  For the purpose of HDR you just need to keep the camera still so a basic tripod and you can adjust and straighten your photo in post-production.  It is also recommended to have a camera remote (canon rs-60e3) which prevents the camera from shaking when you press the shoot button.  If you are traveling and want to pack light just use the timer on your camera so you press the button and there is a short delay before the camera goes off.

Manfrotto tripod

3.  POWER & MEMORY

Taking HDR is requires taking multiple shots for every one photo, usually 3 or 5 but if you are very particular or need a really perfect image you can do more with less exposure range between them.  Thus you will be going through your batteries and memory 3 or 5 times faster, something to prepare for if you are taking a trip.  Note:  if you are planning a trip soon try this technique before you go so you don’t miss a great photo.

4.  THE SUBJECT

The image should not be in motion, repetitive motion is fine for example a waterfall but people walking will result in ghosting – which can be a cool effect but may not be what you want.  If you are shooting architecture this shouldn’t be a problem.  Also, you will likely see the most noticeable improvement in photos where the subject has with lots of color, HDR can be used for monochromatic photography however I found the benefits less apparent.

5.  SOFTWARE

There are a number of software programs available to do the HDR post-production, I always use Adobe Photoshop but this is pretty expensive software, an alternate I have been hearing about is called Photomatrix.

For more research check out this review of HDR software Top 10 Best HDR Software Review 2012

  

OKAY – now you are ready to begin, it is easy

  1. Setup your camera on a tripod as you would for any photo
  2. Using the AEB function set three exposure levels appropriate to your setting with one begin the correct exposure (you can add more exposures as you practice).  You can meter the dark and light spots to find the right exposure range.  If you do not have AEB you will need to adjust the exposure manually after each shot but be careful not to move the camera.
  3. Take the photos, depending on your camera you will either press the shot button once or will need to do it for each shot.
  4. Bring your images into the post-production software and have fun, play around with the features and the light levels. The process will depend on the software you choose, if you are using Photoshop this YouTube video will help you see the process:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qhnd1oNlqCU

13 + 2Untitled_HDR2

You will never say

“Well, you really had to be there” again

If you liked this post, share it with your friends or like us on facebook.

Architectural Photographers that will leave you speechless

Hisao Suzuki Photography

Sometimes the architecture is the star of the photograph  other-times the architecture is the subject and the photograph is the showstopper.  Noteworthy  architectural photographers,  Ezra Stoller, Iwan Baan,  Lucien HervéJulius Shulman, Erieta Attali, and Hisao Suzuki capture architecture that will leave you speechless by the sheer fact that they are amazing photographers.  Architectural photography on occasion is so powerful in their representation their images will forever represent the building’s the photograph.

Architectural photography is an art which two-dimensionally represents the essence of the three-dimensional built form and the architect’s idea and vision.  We can aspire to their work and look at their talent not just as a mastery of technique but also a unique and insightful way they see space, light and lines.  Their photos and career inspire my architectural photography i hope you take a moment to notice the talent of this small collection of images which represent architecture in a magical way.

Ezra Stoller Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Ezra Stoller was born in Chicago, 1915, but grew up in New York.  When he was a student he photographed buildings, models and sculpture. In 1942 he was drafted to work as a photographer for the Army Signal Corps Photo Center. Stoller had a long architectural photography career, working closely with Eero Saarinen, Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Meier, Paul Rudolph, Marcel Breuer, I.M. Pei, Gordon Bunshaft and Mies van der Rohe.

Many modern buildings are known by the iconic images Stoller created due to his talent at visualizing the formal and spatial aspirations of modernist architecture. In 1960 Ezra Stoller was awarded a medal for his photography, the first time the American Institute of Architects awarded a medal for architectural photography.

Ezra Stoller’s photographs are published in countless books and magazines:

Ezra Stoller received an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Pratt Institute in 1998 and died in 2004 in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

http://www.esto.com/ezrastoller.aspx

Iwan Baan Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Iwan Baan was born in 1975 and raised outside of Amsterdam, he studied at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague and worked in New York and Europe in publishing and documentary photography.

In 2005 he proposed that he document a project by OMA to Rem Koolhaas. The documentation of the construction and completion of OMA’s China Central Television (CCTV) building and National Olympic Stadium by Herzog & de Meuron’s in Beijing led to his career in architectural photography.   Since he has photographed work by Frank Gehry, SANAA, Morphosis, Steven Holl, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Toyo Ito and Zaha Hadid.

His work is characterized by the portrayal of people in the architecture, the context, society and environment around architecture.

Books featuring Iwan Baan’s photography:

http://www.iwan.com/iwan_index.php

Lucien Hervé Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Lucien Hervé was born in László Elkán, Hungry, and died in Paris at the age of 26.  Known primarily for his architectural photography of Le Corbusier.

“Lucien Hervé is one of the rare photographers to combine a humanist outlook with an architect’s eye. His characteristic style of cropped frames, plunging or oblique views, and pared-down compositions tending toward abstraction distinguish his work from that of his contemporaries.”

Books on Lucien Hervé:

http://www.lucienherve.com/

Julius Shulman Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Julius Shulman (1910 – 2009) was an American architectural photographer known for his photographs of the California modern architecture movement such as the iconic shots of the Case Study House #22, Frank Lloyd Wright’s or Pierre Koenig’s remarkable structures, have been published countless times.

“The clarity of his work demanded that architectural photography had to be considered as an independent art form. Each Shulman image unites perception and understanding for the buildings and their place in the landscape. The precise compositions reveal not just the architectural ideas behind a building’s surface, but also the visions and hopes of an entire age. A sense of humanity is always present in his work, even when the human figure is absent from the actual photographs.”

Many of the buildings photographed by Shulman have since been demolished or re-purposed, lending to the popularity of his images.  His vast library of images currently reside at the Getty Center in Los Angeles.

Books on Julius Shulman:

http://www.juliusshulmanfilm.com/shulman-photographs/

Erieta Attali Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Erieta Attali was born in Tel Aviv in 1966 and studied Photography at Goldsmith’s College, University of London.
Her talents are proven by her awards including Fulbright Artist Award in Architectural Photography, the Japan Foundation Artist Fellowship,  and the Graham Foundation Grant, Chicago.

Attali’s career as an architectural photographer began by working internationally, being published in various books of architecture and periodicals and being exhibited in major museums and institutions.  From 1992 to 2002 she worked in the field of Archaeological Photography.  From 2003 she has been an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Architectural Photography at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University, New York.

Work of Erieta Attali:

http://www.erietaattali.com/

Hisao Suzuki Photography

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Hisao Suzuki was born in 1957 in Yamagata, Japan. He studied at the Tokyo College of Photography and moved to Barcelona in 1982 to observe the work of Anotnio Gaudi, where he still resides, becoming immersed in contemporary architecture.

Suzuki is currently the principal photographer for the architectural journal El Croquis.

“A photographer may take one of two stances: either demonstrate a work within its reality and its environment, or demonstrate the image of the work that the photographer himself has created. In Suzuki’s case the former is true, for his work is a true testimony and documentation of reality.”

http://www.nuaa.es/eng/hisao.html

VISIT archGROUPIE.com to find modern and contemporary architecture

Vote on the Best Modern Architecture City in the WORLD

architecture world map

There is so much amazing architecture in the world and so many cities to choose from.

architecture GROUPIE is trying to determine which cities are missing from our architecture directory and travel maps.

WE NEED YOUR HELP!

VOTE for your TOP 3 modern and contemporary architecture cities OR add another city we missed.

Forward on to all your architecture groupie friends.

Thanks for your help.

travel guides shopping copy

Starchitect

Starchitect is a blend of two words and their definitions to create a new word.

The Starchitect (star –a architect) describes architects who have obtained celebrity status and fame within the community of architecture as well as become known amongst the general population.  This fame is often a result of architecture which is avant-guard, extremely creative, provocative, the charismatic or intense nature of the architect him or herself, and their unique work that pushes the envelope of modern architecture to the next level.

Since fame is dependent on the media and is designated by others – the starchitect is therefore a fleeting or permanent designation out of the control of the architect.  Sometimes this term is meant derogatorily and some architects have an opinion about it, such as Frank Gehry who stated in his interview with The Independent called Frank Gehry: ‘Don’t call me a starchitect’

“I don’t know who invented that f—ing word ‘starchitect’. In fact a journalist invented it, I think. I am not a ‘star-chitect’, I am an ar-chitect…”

Some well known starchitecture:

Some of the most well known starchitects include:

 

Is the ‘starchitect’ a new phenomenon or were architect’s historically famous and the media and pop culture packaged and ‘branded’ the architect in a way similar to movie celebrities to further romanticize the profession or popularize architecture again?

Related starchitect articles worth checking out:

Here Now, the Craziest Starchitect Projects of the Year by Curbed

The ‘Starchitect’ Effect on Condo Prices by The Wall Street Journal

Starchitects: Visionary Architects of the Twenty-first Century